Category: Food & Drink

How To make a Yogurt?

Dec 28th 2011, 12:04 pm
Posted by komai
1231 Views
Love yogurt, teach me how!
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Answers
patr
Dec 28th 2011, 4:39 pm
Here is your steps.. VERY EASY... First...

1 quart (946 mL) milk (any kind but if you use "ultra-high pasteurized" or "UHP" or "UHT" then you can skip step one, as the milk has already been heated to this temperature before the pack was sealed)
1/4 to 1/2 cup non-fat dry milk (optional)
1 tablespoons white sugar to feed the bacteria
pinch salt (optional)
2 tablespoons existing yogurt with live cultures (or you can use freeze-dried bacteria instead)

step 1) Heat the milk to 185ºF (85ºC). Using two pots that fit inside one another, create a double boiler. This will prevent your milk from burning, and you should only have to stir it occasionally. If you cannot do this, and must heat the milk directly, be sure to monitor it constantly, stirring all the while. If you do not have a thermometer, 185ºF (85ºC) is the temperature at which milk starts to froth. It is highly recommended that you obtain a thermometer in the range of 100 - 212ºF, especially if you plan to make yogurt on an ongoing basis.

step 2) Cool the milk to 110ºF (43ºC). The best way to do this is with a cold water bath. This will quickly and evenly lower the temperature, and requires only occasional stirring. If cooling at room temperature, or in the refrigerator, you must stir it more frequently. Don't proceed until the milk is below 120ºF (49ºC), and don't allow it to go below 90ºF (32ºC); 110ºF (43ºC) is optimal.

step 3) Warm the starter. Let the starter yogurt sit at room temperature while you're waiting for the milk to cool. This will prevent it from being too cold when you add it in.

step 4) Add nonfat dry milk, if desired. Adding about 1/4 cup to 1/2 cup nonfat dry milk at this time will increase the nutritional content of the yogurt. The yogurt will also thicken more easily. This is especially helpful if you're using nonfat milk.

step 5) Add the starter. Add 2 tablespoons of the existing yogurt, or add the freeze-dried bacteria. Stir it in or better yet, use a blender to evenly distribute the billions of bacteria throughout the milk.

step 6) Put the mixture in containers. Pour the milk into a clean container or containers. Cover each one tightly with a lid or plastic wrap.

step 7) Allow the yogurt bacteria to incubate. Keep the yogurt warm and still to encourage bacterial growth, while keeping the temperature as close to 100ºF (38ºC) as possible. An oven with a pilot light left on is one option; see the "Tips" section for other ideas. After seven hours, you'll have a custard-like texture, a cheesy odor, and possibly some greenish liquid on top. This is exactly what you want. The longer you let it sit beyond seven hours, the thicker and tangier it will become.

step 8) Refrigerate the yogurt. Place the yogurt in your fridge for several hours before serving. It will keep for 1 to 2 weeks. If you're going to use some of it as starter, use it within 5 to 7 days, so that the bacteria still have growing power. Whey, a thin yellow liquid, will form on the top. You can pour it off or stir it in before eating your yogurt.

step 9) Add optional flavorings. Experiment until you develop a flavor that your taste buds fancy. Canned pie filling, jams, maple syrup, and ice-cream fudges are good flavorings. For a healthier option, use fresh fruit, with or without a small amount of sugar or honey.

step 10) Use yogurt from this batch as the starter for the next batch.
jgjerro hi patricia
Jan 14th 2012, 6:40 am
cassie
Dec 28th 2011, 5:37 pm
This is definitely too much work,,,,,I better off buying it instead. Too time consuming in preparation and eaten in a few minutes, doesn't make sense to me.
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mtbeau1955
Jan 3rd 2012, 10:47 am
This is good information, but I don not have time to make yogurt. I love the Greek style when I do eat it, it has a more robust flavor, and I mix in my own choice of fruit to sweeten it. This is good though for those that have the time to make their own. you should start a blog with the writing you do. Do me a favor if you would though, can you comment on my blogs for me, even if you don't like them it will help out. I get what they call link juice when I get comments, which is like bonus points. Thanks Patrici.
mtbeau1955
Jan 3rd 2012, 10:45 am
This is good information, but I don't have the time to make yogurt. I love the greek style when I do eat it, it has a more robust flavor, and I mix in my own choice of fruit to sweeten it. This is good though for those that have the time to make their own. you should start a blog with the writing you do. Do me a favor if you would though, can you comment on my blogs for me, even if you don't like them it will help out. I get what they call link juice when I get comments, which is like bonus points. Thanks Patrici.
mtbeau1955
Jan 3rd 2012, 10:46 am
This is good information, but I don't have the time to make yogurt. I love the greek style when I do eat it, it has a more robust flavor, and I mix in my own choice of fruit to sweeten it. This is good though for those that have the time to make their own. you should start a blog with the writing you do. Do me a favor if you would though, can you comment on my blogs for me, even if you don't like them it will help out. I get what they call link juice when I get comments, which is like bonus points. Thanks Patrici.
mtbeau1955
Jan 3rd 2012, 10:46 am
This is good information, but I don't have the time to make yogurt. I love the Greek style when I do eat it, it has a more robust flavor, and I mix in my own choice of fruit to sweeten it. This is good though for those that have the time to make their own. you should start a blog with the writing you do. Do me a favor if you would though, can you comment on my blogs for me, even if you don't like them it will help out. I get what they call link juice when I get comments, which is like bonus points. Thanks Patrici.
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